Category Archives: Congo Square Theatre

Wastwater at Steep Theatre: What’s that about still waters?

On WDCB on Sunday, we discuss the US premiere of Simon Stephens’ play at Steep, and then K. recommends the two plays she saw at American Players Theatre up in Spring Green, WI.

 

What I Learned in Paris 5

In brief: Court’s Satchmo…, Congo Square’s What I Learned… and The Gilded Age at City Lit

K. sez:

Satchmo at the Waldorf, Court Theatre, through February 7: Terry Teachout’s look at the life of Louis Armstrong, told as the reminiscences of the entertainer himself, is both funny and sweet-sad. In this Midwest premiere, the show rests entirely on the shoulders of Barry Shabaka Henley, who plays not only Armstrong but his manager Joe Glaser and his nemesis Miles Davis. On opening night, Henley had a few stumbles with the text, but his Armstrong is pitch-perfect, literally: as soon as you hear his voice you know you’re in good hands. He’s also outrageously good as Davis, portrayed here as a clueless stoner whose naysaying about Armstrong’s persona meant he just didn’t get what was going on. The only weakness in the performance is Henley’s version of Glaser, Armstrong’s friend and ultimate betrayer: what’s supposed to be Chicago-New York-Jewish-gangster patois sounds more like Middle American Generic White Man. And don’t go expecting music: a few moments of scratchy recording are all we hear. But the show, under Charles Newell’s direction, is still a delight.

What I Learned in Paris, Congo Square Theatre, through February 7: In this show—part rom-com, part door-slamming farce—Pearl Cleage pays homage to Noel Coward’s Private Lives by bringing together an ex-husband and ex-wife on the eve of his wedding to Wife #2. The setting, though, is quite different: it’s Atlanta in 1973, and Maynard Jackson has just been elected the city’s first African-American mayor. As J.P. Madison jockeys for position in the new administration and struggles for an impossible level of respectability, in walks ex-wife Evie, who is anything but respectable. Shanesia Davis is spectacular as the convention-defying, loving-but-scheming, feminist-but-man-keeping Evie, and the rest of the cast plays up to her level. Darren Jones is particularly fine as J.P., who imagines he’s leading and is actually being led—by the nose. And I’d like costume designer Marci Rodgers to come home with me and make all my clothes so I look like Evie. A feminist romp among the African-American elites—it could hardly be more fun. Thanks to director Daniel Bryant for coming home from New York long enough to knock this one out of the park.

The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, City Lit Theater, through February 21: I’d hoped this adaptation of Mark Twain’s novel would feel more like a critique of today’s Gilded Age; but it was hard to remember that when Jacquelyne Jones was on the stage, which is virtually the entire time. Jones plays Laura Hawkins, an impoverished Southern belle who sets out to conquer 1870s Washington and succeeds until she encounters the man who loved and ruined her in 1860s Tennessee. Disaster, needless to say, ensues. Paul Edwards’s adaptation is superb in clarifying and maintaining the momentum of a complex story, and Jones’s performance is so rich that we mostly don’t care what happens as long as she’s still there to be watched. This is a going-to-be-a-big-star performance. The rest of the company, under Adam Goldstein’s direction, is fine in the classic City Lit manner, playing numerous roles and conveying shifts of time and location with ease. If you don’t carry in with you the notion—or, perhaps, the hope—that Twain somehow skewered today’s Congress, you won’t be disappointed. And, to be fair, the portrait of a Congress for sale and at the mercy of lobbyists rings true and contemporary; it’s just not ugly enough to seem to be a real critique. That’s what happens when life outstrips art, or truth is stranger than fiction.

Congo Square’s Twisted Melodies Addresses Mental Illness With Music

J. and K. laud the performance in this one-man show while debating the text. Also, praise for the Saints, who support the Chicago performing arts community in every way.

King Hedley II 1

The Welcome Return of Congo Square Theatre Company: King Hedley II Kicks Ass and (Literally) Takes Names

The cast of King Hedley II (Tiffany Addison, TaRon Patton, Marc Rogers, Trinity Murdock, Anthony Irons and Ronald Conner seated in front) by Congo Square Theatre Company at the Athenaeum.  Photo by Samuel G. Roberson Jr.

K. sez:

Daniel Bryant’s production of August Wilson’s King Hedley II at Congo Square Theatre Company is near-perfect. (Has a critic ever pronounced anything perfect?) An opportunity to watch some exceptional actors at work, including Taron Patton and Trinity Murdock, and a play that seemed rote and pointless in its Goodman production comes to quivering life. Not clear why the Act I-closing plant mutilation (a shocker, and thus the only memorable moment, at the Goodman) fails to hit–but if Bryant and Co. ever figure that out, at least one critic will be ready to acknowledge perfection.

Through April 6 at the Athenaeum in West Lakeview: don’t miss it.